Increased Load Capacity and Increased Energy Efficiency of the Gear

Continuous generating gear grinding is the most economical process for the hard-finishing of gears. Since Reishauer invented this grinding process in 1945, the company has maintained Global technological leadership.

As a rule, grinding takes place after the workpiece has been hardened. This ensures that all geometrical inaccuracies of premachining and all hardening distortions are completely removed. Additional to the high geometrical accuracy, grinding achieves excellent surface finishes.

The so-called continuous shifting – a constant lateral displacement of the grinding worm during the grinding process – ensures that only fresh and free-cutting abrasive grains are in use. This not only increases the geometrical accuracy of the ground gears but also prevents grinding abuse (burning) on the gear flanks.

Reishauer’s invention of the LowNoise Shifting adds a further dimension: the ground tooth flanks feature specific surface structures which prevent noise generation (NVH) in transmissions.

Polish grinding in one clamping operation, done after the roughing grinding pass, offers additional possibilities of improving the surface finish. Polish grinding not only reduces the surface roughness, it also leads to higher bearing ratios and improved energy efficiency of tooth flanks. The achieved energy savings in transmissions are directly reflected in the overall reduced fuel consumption of automotive vehicles.

The high productivity of Reishauer’s continuous generating grinding is a direct result of the well-engineered two-spindle technology. While one workpiece is being ground on one spindle, a second workpiece can be simultaneously meshed and positioned on the second spindle. Thus, there is practically no loss of cycle time between the grinding of two workpieces. This technology makes it possible to grind planetary pinions of automatic transmissions in cycle times of less than 10 seconds; constantly in three-shift operations.

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